Fundido.com Guide to The Food Of Mexico

Posted on 17. Oct, 2010 by in Featured

peppersA Guide to the Food of Mexico

By Sally Plunkett

f you are an adventurous eater who can handle a bit of spice, there is plenty to reward your palette in Mexico. Otherwise there are a few regular dishes that are always of a high standard, tasty and not too spicy. Most menus usually specify if meals are spicy but if not the best thing to do is ask if a dish is spicy – “es picante?” Beware of small bottles or jars looking suspiciously like ketchup which more often than not contain very hot salsa such as “Salsa Habanera”, always try a small bit on the side before covering your whole meal!

A good idea is to see where there are lots of locals eating as they are bound to know the tastiest place to eat!! Make sure that food is piping hot and fresh if buying from street stalls and remember if it’s crowded it’s likely to be good!

Take it easy at first on your Mexico, Guatemala and Belize itinerary so you can then try some unique regional specialities which you wouldn’t find on a Mexican menu anywhere outside of Mexico.

STAPLE FOODS, SIDES & SNACKS

Chilies

General rule is the bigger the chili, the milder the flavour. Take care!

The habaƱero is small and ferociously hot.

Large Poblano chillies which are mild like peppers/capsicums are stuffed and served as a main course.

Guacamole

Avocado mashed with finely chopped onions, chillies, tomato and coriander.

Served as a dip with nachos or a side dish.

Empanadas

Delicious pies, usually filled with meat.

Similar to our pasties but smaller.

Frijoles (beans)-

Mexican staple.

Can either be main ingredient in a meal or served as a side dish.

Different varieties of beans are most commonly boiled then refried.

Most people get put off by the appearance of refried beans but they are delicious!

Nachos

Tostadas served loaded with salsa or sour cream as a snack or appetiser.

Served with refried beans, cheese, chillies, shredded chicken etc as a main meal.

Queso Fundido

Literally melted cheese, simple and tasty.

Served like a cheese fondue with mushrooms or peppers.

Pico de Gallo

Abasic salsa that is used as an all-purpose condiment on every table in Mexico.

Chopped Tomatoes, Jalapeno chilies, onion, garlic, coriander, lime juice.

Salsa Verde or Salsa Roja

Green or red sauce mixed with tomatoes, onions, red or green chilli and coriander.

Served as a dip or relish.

In Belize look out for Marie Sharp’s hot sauce, available in Hot, Very Hot and Beware!!

Tortillas

Staple diet of all Mexicans.

Can be made from maize/corn which is common in the south or flour which is more common in the north.

Usually served with a meal like we have bread but also form part of many typical dishes.

Can be rolled and baked for enchiladas.

Can be fried for tacos.

Can be grilled for quesadillas.

Tortas

A Mexican style sandwich.

Tostadas

Thin and crisp fried tortillas.

Served with nachos or dips as an appetiser.

It is always sensible on a Mayan Route Tour to be careful when trying food you are not accustomed to, especially for the first few days as your stomach will not be used to the new flavours and hot spices. Sometimes people get excited and rush straight in wishing to try the hottest thing on the menu! It’s true though, that most stomach trouble experienced by travellers on a Mexico self drive tour is Mexico is due to un-purified ice or from salad washed in un-purified water.

Explore Jungle Temples And Waterfalls. Mayans, Markets And Mountain Villages. See Pelicans Along The Rio Dulce And Relax On Belize Barefoot Island. We’ll Help You Build Your Own Mexico, Guatemala And Belize Adventure.

Mexico Travel Plan

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2 Responses to “Fundido.com Guide to The Food Of Mexico”

  1. kenneth earp

    31. Oct, 2010

    please send me a price list or your most upto date catalog thank you

  2. admin

    20. Feb, 2011

    No catalog Yet… maybe some day. Thanks for asking…

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